I deserve a raise

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The job market is red hot. Last year, three-quarters of PR pros got a raise, but more than half of those were 3 percent or less (source: PR News Salary Survey).

Because you’re reading my posts, you’re likely a go-getter who is performing well. And if you haven’t gotten a bigger raise than 3 percent – especially if you’ve been at the same job for five years or more – your employer would have to pay a lot more to replace you than they’re currently paying you.

That’s what an experienced PR recruiter and career coach told my Inner Circle this week. She recently talked with a candidate who is making $30,000 less than market value for someone with her skills and results.

Now don’t read this the wrong way – neither you nor I are entitled to anything. We earn what we’re paid, commensurate with the value we bring our employers or clients. But if that equation isn’t balanced, then it’s up to you to take steps to fix it.

If you like your current job, you don’t have to go out banging on doors just yet. Ask your boss for a “career conversation,” as my guest, Angee Linsey of Linsey Careers, calls it. She teaches that all professionals should be having these at least quarterly. And that smart managers who want to retain their best performers will welcome that cadence.

Angee outlined five steps to a successful career conversation during our Master Class this week, which is available only to Inner Circle members. She taught them how to prepare, gave tips on timing, and how to follow up to make sure they actually get that raise or promotion. I thought one of her most valuable contributions was a set of recommended statements that minimize the emotional discomfort associated with asking for money.

Here’s one of them:

Over the last 18 months I have really expanded my role by adding XYZ to my plate. Would this effort make me eligible for an increase in salary above the standard annual 2%? What would I need to do to make this possible?

So if you’re really delivering, ask for that career conversation today.

If you’ve already tried that, and the enhanced pay or independence you’re seeking hasn’t come, then you may need to move on. One Inner Circle member told me last month she returned to a job after two years somewhere else, and now she makes 49 percent more than when she left. Another took the media relations track record she’d developed applying what she’s learned in my program to a new company and got a 40 percent pay increase.

Inner Circle members are watching the recording of my presentation with Angee and applying her tips – you can join them right now. Here are all the details.

This article was originally published on Jun 14, 2018.